Landscape[風景画] 描画技法のメニューに戻る/ステップ 1 >>2 >>3 >>4

Landscape Demonstration(原文)

Step 1

landscape step 1

Now we will explore a totally different project. We will paint a landscape, actually a "riverscape". This time, the problem is much more difficult, because instead of static object models with controlled lighting, we will be painting outdoors; the lighting, clouds, water and boats will constantly change their positions and relationships. Thus, we will have to work fast to capture the scene. We must carefully plan how we will proceed so that unnecessary delays in trying to make decisions are avoided. Many artists find it practical to confine their out-door work to information sketches; they then develop the final painting in the studio, without undue time pressure.

The subject of my particular painting is a view of Hook Mountain on the Hudson River near my studio in Upper-Nyack-on-Hudson, New York. In fact, this painting became the basis for the winning design for a mural commission competition for the Friends of the Nyacks Foundation.

The scene was painted in late afternoon, on a day that threatened storms. The lighting changed rapidly. Dramatic clouds formed. When a ray of sunshine broke through these clouds, the entire scene became magical. Several sailing boats were scattered over the river, providing me with models for the boats in my composition.

As you work on a landscape painting, you realize that the artist chooses a very difficult task to reduce the towering heights of a mountain to a mere few inches of paper. Everything must be handled proportionately, so that the scale of the entire landscape is correctly perceived by the viewer.

For this painting, I washed over a base paper with a brilliant blue acrylic color. I plan to let much of the background show through the oil pastel painting, and thus the acrylic underpainting will be an integral part of the composition. Notice that I applied the blue wash quite flat, with complete coverage. The slight variation in surface, so necessary to avoid boredom, was achieved mainly by adjusting the direction of the brush strokes.

To reduce the brightness of this color, I cover over the painted paper with neutral gray oil pastel, 32C1 (Warm Gray). I color the whole paper with this gray to give me a more subdued blue to work with. I use short broad strokes, with the side of a one inch sized piece of oil pastel.

In this stage of the painting, we are concerned with establishing the major masses and simple forms. You must analyze, at this point, what is vital and essential to your expression of this scene, and not get carried away with the millions of details that nature presents to you. Rather than try for the impossible task of representing all details in a single painting, instead, try to extract and emphasize what moved you in the first place to paint the scene. In this particular case, the dramatic sky provides my creative focal interest.

Upon the specially prepared background, I begin with 38F1 (Cerulean Blue) to indicate the major composition of the painting. I sketch in the silhouette of the mountain and the level of the water, breaking the paper into general areas.

The challenge in this painting is to be able to portray the many textures of the water, the clouds, mountain, trees, sails, and so forth, all the while maintaining the unity of the view as a whole.

This is obviously not an easy challenge, and would require, one would think, a vast array of tones and colors. Yet even this complex scene can be successfully handled with the 25 color Introductory Set of Holbein Professional Oil Pastels. The special problems of using a limited palette were made up for by needing to carry only a small set of oil pastels, a drawing board and previously prepared paper onto the small boat from which I painted the scene.

II begin suggesting the lightest area of the sky with 13A4 (Light Scarlet). I roughly indicate the area where the sun breaks through the clouds. I use the side of the stick, which makes a more powerful, wide trace on the paper than the end would have done. I establish the light source and the direction of the rays that emanate from the clouds. With the same light scarlet 13A4, I indicate the reflected light on the water. I use very light strokes.

I use 38B1 (Cobalt Blue) to indicate the darker areas of the mountain. I apply this blue mainly with the broad side of the stick. I underpaint the entire area, which I will later express with greens. I also use 38B1 to suggest the dark lower portions of the clouds.

As you continue developing your own painting, you will begin to see some of the distinct advantages oil pastel has for the outdoor painter. The oil pastel surface is much less fragile than the unfixed soft pastel surface. You do not have to worry about an inadvertent brushing of the surface of the painting in progress.

Should that happen, irreparable damage will not result. You can work and rework the layers of oil pastel, using strong pressure on the oil pastel stick. You have plenty of opportunity to use scraping techniques and make major corrections.

I had decided, before painting this scene, to populate the river with boats of the late 19th Century -- side-wheeler steamers and skiffs. I thus was not going to paint the scene exactly as I saw it, but would instead observe today's riverboats for lighting effects and general color. I had done my research before going on location, and carried several sketches of the different boats I wanted in my picture. Combining my observations of today's boats with the silhouettes and details of the 19th century vessels, adds a realistic tone to the creative work. Real objects can serve very well as models and "stand-ins" for slightly different objects that you prefer to include in your painting. In this way your particular artistic statement will appear lifelike and convincing in the final work.

Since the sun was setting, I chose to indicate the sails of the boats with the sky sketching color, 13A4 (Light Scarlet). The color of the white sails clearly reflects the late afternoon source of light. I also indicate the bodies of the side-wheelers with the same color.

As a last step in the establishing stage, I introduce 45L1 (Sap Green) over the blue area of the mountains.

I apply this color vigorously, sometimes overrunning even my drawings of the side-wheelers and the water surface. I use 20A1 (Purple) to suggest the purplish cast on the far shore of the Hudson River. I choose 32B4 (Non-color #2), a light gray, to suggest the brightness of the sky.

風景画デモンストレーション

ステップ 1

次は、ぜんぜん違ったものに取り掛かる。私たちは風景、実際に"河の風景"を描こう。今度はこれまでよりずっと難しくなる。(肖像画や静物画では、)モデルはじっと動かず、照明もコントロールされていた。しかし、野外では、照明、雲、水、およびボートは絶えず互いの位置関係を変えるだろう。したがって、私たちは、風景を画面に写し取るために素早く作業しなければならないだろう。私たちは、スムースに作業が進められるよう、慎重に計画をたてなければならない。多くの芸術家が、彼らの野外の仕事をスケッチに専念するのが実際的なやり方だと考えている。そして、彼らはスタジオに帰ってから時間の制約を受けずにその絵を仕上げる。

今度の絵は、ハドソン川とその向こうに見えるフック山の風景である。それは、ニューヨークUpper-Nyack-on-Hudsonにある私のスタジオからの眺めである。事実上、この絵はNyacks財団の仲間のための壁画コミッション競争のためのウイニングデザインのための基礎になった。(意味不明です。(^^;)

風景画は嵐に見舞われた日の午後遅くに製作された。照明は急速に変化し、雲は劇的に形を変えた。日の光がこれらの雲の隙間から差し込んだ様子は、まるで魔法のようだった。モデルをかってでたかのように、数隻の帆船が川の上に点在していた。

風景画を描くということは、高くそびえている山を紙の上に数インチに縮小するという困難な作業である。全体の風景の大きさが見る人によって正しく見えるように、すべてが等しく比例して扱われなければならない。

この絵のために、私は明るい青のアクリル絵の具で紙全体を着色しておいた。私は、この青い背景の多くの部分がオイルパステルの隙間を通して見えるように残すつもりだ。そして、その結果、アクリルの下塗りは構成の不可欠の部分になるだろう。私が青の下塗りを平らにそして塗り残しがないように施したのを見てほしい。しかし、完全に均一では退屈なので、主に筆の運びによって変化をつけてある。

このすこし明るすぎる色を押さえるために、私はニュートラルグレーのオイルパステル、32C1(ウォームグレイ)を使って紙全体をカバーするようにする。この灰色で紙全体を着色すると、より控え目な青をベースに作業することになる。私はオイルパステルを1インチに大きさに折り、その側面を用いて短く幅広いストロークを使用する。

絵のこの段階では、大きな塊と単純な形を作り上げることに気を配る。あなたはこの場面でなにが重大で不可欠なのか分析しなければならない。自然があなたに提示する何百万ものディテールといっしょに(その大事なもの)を捨て去ってはいけない。ただ一つの絵にすべてのディテールを表現するという困難な仕事に取り組むよりむしろあなたがその場所を選んだ理由を思い起こして、それを強調しなさい。この特定の場合では、劇的な空が私の創作意欲を沸き立たせた中心である。

このように特別に準備された背景の上に、私は38F1(セルリアンブルー)を使い絵の主要な構成を示し始める。画面をいくつかの領域に分割して、私は山のシルエットと水面をスケッチする。

全体としての統一感を維持しつつ、水、雲、山、木、帆などの質感を描くことがこの絵の課題である。

これは明らかに簡単な課題ではない。トーンと色が勢ぞろいしているということを考えさせられる。しかし、この複雑な風景さえ、ホルベイン専門家用オイルパステル入門用25色セットで十分こなすことができる。この少ない色数で製作するのは、困難が伴うが、私が描いた小型ボートまで実際に移動するときに、オイルパステルの小さいセット、画板、および下塗りされた紙だけを運べばよかったので、その困難さは埋め合わせをされた。

私は13A4(ライトスカーレット)を使い空の最も明るい領域を示し始める。私は大まかに、太陽が雲の切れ間から現れるところを描く。私はスティックの側面を使用する。それは、普通にスティックの端を使うより、より強力で、幅広い跡を形作る。私は雲間から発する光線の光源と方向を確定する。同じライトスカーレット13A4を使い、私は水の上に反射光を示す。私は非常に軽いストロークを使用する。

私は、山の、より暗い領域を示すのに、38B1(コパルトブルー)を使用する。私は主にこの青のスティックの広い側面を使う。私は全体の領域を下塗りするが、その部分は、あとで緑色にするつもりだ。また、私は、雲の暗い下側の部分を示すのに38B1(コパルトブルー)を使用する。

あなた自身の絵の製作を続けて行くと、あなたはオイルパステルが野外の画家にとって顕著な利点があることに気づいていくだろう。オイルパステル画の表面は定着性のないパステル画の表面よりもあまりこわれやすくない。描きかけの絵の表面を不注意にこすってしまうことを心配する必要はない。

もし、こすってしまっても、修繕できないほどの損害は生じないだろう。オイルパステルスティックに強い圧力を加えれば、あなたはオイルパステルのレイヤーを加筆、修正することができる。あなたには、スクレイプ(削り取る)のテクニックを使用して、大きく修正をする機会がいくらでもある。

この風景画を始める前に、私は、19世紀後半のボートを川の上に配置すると決めていた。そのボートは側面に水車がついた蒸気船と小型の帆船である。だから私は、自分が見たとおりには、描かないつもりだった。代わりに照明効果と一般的な色を見るために現代の河舟を観察するつもりだ。私は絵を描きに出る前に、私が絵の中に欲しいいろいろなボートのスケッチを用意し、持って来た。19世紀の船の外観と細部のスケッチに現代の河舟を重ね合わせ、絵の中に本物のような19世紀の船を絵に加えた。本物の物体は、あなたが絵の中におきたいと思う、本物とは少しだけ違うモチーフのためのモデルと「代役」として非常によく役に立つ。このようにして、あなたの特定の芸術的な声明は完成した絵において生き生きと説得力をもつだろう。

すでに太陽が沈んでいたので、私は、空の色、13A4(ライト・スカーレット)を使いボートの帆を描いた。白帆の色は明確に午後遅い時間の光の色を反映する。また、私は同じ色を使い蒸気船の船体を描く。

第一段階の最後のステップとして、私は山の青い領域に45L1(サップグリーン)を取り入れる。

私は蒸気船や水面にもこの色をどんどん使う。私は、ハドソン川の対岸に紫がかって見える何かを示すのに、20A1(パープル)を使用する。私は、空の明るさを示すために32B4(無彩色#2)、ライトグレーを選ぶ。